dentistry student with patient with the Dallas skyline

College of Dentistry

For us, "what if" is not a simple question. It’s what we wake up for. At Texas A&M, we boldly raise our hands first and find solutions to seemingly impossible questions. Whether addressing health disparities in underserved populations, the struggles within America’s health care system, or cutting-edge innovations to fight the deadliest diseases, we are on the forefront of every human need. Steeped in tradition and united by values, together we make the impossible, possible.

Making What If Possible

Our Story

At Texas A&M College of Dentistry, our legacy is a platform for the future. For more than 100 years, we’ve put patients at the top of our list by combining higher education and research with community service. As the largest oral health care provider in North Texas, we bring care to people in need—whenever and wherever they need it. With all nine dental specialties, our educational experience is unmatched, and our drive to change lives through innovative technologies and cutting-edge research is unstoppable. To us, access to quality oral health care is an expectation, not a privilege. Through compassionate care, we’re making an enduring difference that reaches well beyond our walls.

Largest single oral health care provider in north Texas: 100K patient visits annually.
dentist looking at root canal images

What if we could revolutionize the root canal?

A root canal is a common procedure to fix tooth decay or trauma, but what if a new way of treatment can regenerate what’s left of the healthy tooth? Researchers at the College of Dentistry are revolutionizing the modern-day root canal.

A root canal is a common procedure to fix tooth decay or trauma, but what if a new way of treatment can regenerate what’s left of the healthy tooth? Researchers at the College of Dentistry are revolutionizing the modern-day root canal.

bioadhesive on a patient's lip

What if canker sores were a thing of the past?

Oral ulcers can be painful and annoying, and current treatment plans only dull or numb the pain, letting the sore linger. This can make simple tasks like eating or drinking a painful ordeal, but dentistry experts are looking to bioadhesive bandages to keep oral ulcers at bay.

Oral ulcers can be painful and annoying, and current treatment plans only dull or numb the pain, letting the sore linger. This can make simple tasks like eating or drinking a painful ordeal, but dentistry experts are looking to bioadhesive bandages to keep oral ulcers at bay.

dentist working on patient

What if your dentist’s care extended beyond the exam chair?

The days of dental health care providers compartmentalizing their expertise to dental disease have long passed. As the overall medical complexity of the general population changes, so must the dental clinician’s ability to understand implications this change brings to the delivery of safe and effective dental care.

The days of dental health care providers compartmentalizing their expertise to dental disease have long passed. As the overall medical complexity of the general population changes, so must the dental clinician’s ability to understand implications this change brings to the delivery of safe and effective dental care.

dentist working at microscope

What if dentists could regenerate an entire tooth?

Researchers at the College of Dentistry are changing the way we look at dental implants and getting to the root of dental engineering. Creating a “bio-tooth” could provide an alternative to dental implants and restorations for millions of people.

Researchers at the College of Dentistry are changing the way we look at dental implants and getting to the root of dental engineering. Creating a “bio-tooth” could provide an alternative to dental implants and restorations for millions of people.

dentistry faculty member instructing students

What if we could close the dental care gap?

As one of only three dental schools in the state, the Texas A&M College of Dentistry has an important role to serve the needs of Texans in the future. As the largest oral health care provider in North Texas, the college treats more than 100,000 patients annually, many of which are low-income and underserved.

As one of only three dental schools in the state, the Texas A&M College of Dentistry has an important role to serve the needs of Texans in the future. As the largest oral health care provider in North Texas, the college treats more than 100,000 patients annually, many of which are low-income and underserved.

elderly patient examining her face

What if we could restore missing parts of the face?

Through a combination of art, science and digital technology, the Center for Maxillofacial Prosthodontics at the College of Dentistry is able to restore malformed and missing parts of the human face, including eyes, ears, noses and even the entire face.

Through a combination of art, science and digital technology, the Center for Maxillofacial Prosthodontics at the College of Dentistry is able to restore malformed and missing parts of the human face, including eyes, ears, noses and even the entire face.