medical researcher

College of Medicine

For us, "what if" is not a simple question. It’s what we wake up for. At Texas A&M, we boldly raise our hands first and find solutions to seemingly impossible questions. Whether addressing health disparities in underserved populations, the struggles within America’s health care system, or cutting-edge innovations to fight the deadliest diseases, we are on the forefront of every human need. Steeped in tradition and united by values, together we make the impossible, possible.

Making What If Possible

Our Story

At Texas A&M College of Medicine, we were created to boldly serve. More than 40 years later, that mission has not wavered. Our purpose is to treat those among us with the greatest need, and in areas often forgotten by others. We’re bringing care to downtown and the small town, and everywhere in between to reach rural populations in ways never conceived before. But we don’t stop there. We’re challenging age-old beliefs about how medicine is delivered, where it is delivered and why it is delivered. By serving those who have served us, we’re improving military health and discovering the next generation with an unmatched heart of service. Through technology-supported innovation that can only be imagined today, we’re on the forefront of the next medical revolution that promises to reinvent health care in the 21st century. Connected by our values and staunch desire to do more, we’re leading the way for a better future for all.

Ranked number one most afforable medical school for in-state tuition by US News and World Report.
medical researcher working with lab equipment

What if we could eradicate tuberculosis?

A rapid point-of-care, low cost tuberculosis (TB) test dramatically reduces the current delays in TB diagnosis with incredible accuracy. Early diagnosis enables appropriate treatment to begin earlier, which reduces the death rate and helps stop the spread of the infection, potentially freeing entire communities of the disease.

A rapid point-of-care, low cost tuberculosis (TB) test dramatically reduces the current delays in TB diagnosis with incredible accuracy. Early diagnosis enables appropriate treatment to begin earlier, which reduces the death rate and helps stop the spread of the infection, potentially freeing entire communities of the disease.

female patient in hospital bed

What if gender didn't determine your disease?

Many diseases affect men and women differently, and in the past many physicians treated everything outside the reproductive system the same. Now, Texas A&M is leading the way in research on the different ways disease affects the sexes, from stroke and heart disease to infections.

Many diseases affect men and women differently, and in the past many physicians treated everything outside the reproductive system the same. Now, Texas A&M is leading the way in research on the different ways disease affects the sexes, from stroke and heart disease to infections.

doctor making notes on a whiteboard

What if a treatment for diabetes was in the body all along?

A compound produced by the microbiota of the gut may be as good as metformin—the leading anti-diabetic drug—in treating diabetes. If this compound could be introduced into the body of someone with diabetes, it may open new treatments and revolutionize our understanding of how the microbiome affects our health.

A compound produced by the microbiota of the gut may be as good as metformin—the leading anti-diabetic drug—in treating diabetes. If this compound could be introduced into the body of someone with diabetes, it may open new treatments and revolutionize our understanding of how the microbiome affects our health.

two medical researchers discussing their work

What if your physician was also an engineer?

Texas A&M will bring together its world-class engineering program with its medical research and education to graduate a generation of physician-engineers prepared to tackle some of the toughest health care challenges with innovative technological solutions.

Texas A&M will bring together its world-class engineering program with its medical research and education to graduate a generation of physician-engineers prepared to tackle some of the toughest health care challenges with innovative technological solutions.

abandoned hospital equipment

What if your town’s hospital closed, and health care stayed?

Texas A&M researchers studied the alarming rate of rural hospital closures in Texas and found that a town’s residents can actually continue receiving high-quality health care. Solutions include expanding telemedicine options, conversion of former hospitals into freestanding emergency rooms and the creation of rural health clinics.

Texas A&M researchers studied the alarming rate of rural hospital closures in Texas and found that a town’s residents can actually continue receiving high-quality health care. Solutions include expanding telemedicine options, conversion of former hospitals into freestanding emergency rooms and the creation of rural health clinics.

silhouettes of soldiers

What if we could end PTSD in veterans?

Many veterans come home with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Although standard treatments work for some, the suicide rate among veterans remains alarming. That’s why mental health professionals at Texas A&M and the Department of Veterans Affairs are working on new treatments, including one that integrates behavior therapy and mindfulness training.

Many veterans come home with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Although standard treatments work for some, the suicide rate among veterans remains alarming. That’s why mental health professionals at Texas A&M and the Department of Veterans Affairs are working on new treatments, including one that integrates behavior therapy and mindfulness training.

50%of graduates enter primary care residency to address the primary care physician shortage in Texas.

Grace Lassiter, MD

At the age of five Grace Lassiter failed her first hearing test. Throughout her life she was able to adapt to situations even in times of doubt. Lassiter’s determination and belief in her calling to go to medical school helped her overcome those feelings of doubt and pursue a career in surgery.

Mark Ahlenius, MD

Mark Ahlenius, MD, didn’t just graduate from medical school, that same day he commissioned to the U.S. Army. As a pediatric specialist, he won’t just serve our country while deployed, he’ll serve active duty and veteran families upon his return—in short, he’ll serve those who are serving America.

Alan Leifeste, MD

Alan Leifeste, MD, has lived a life divided by chapters and united by service. After graduating Texas A&M College of Medicine, Leifeste was one of the first Army physicians deployed to Baghdad and now practices medicine in a rural part of the Texas Hill Country.