nurses working with patients in the field

College of Nursing

For us, "what if" is not a simple question. It’s what we wake up for. At Texas A&M, we boldly raise our hands first and find solutions to seemingly impossible questions. Whether addressing health disparities in underserved populations, the struggles within America’s health care system, or cutting-edge innovations to fight the deadliest diseases, we are on the forefront of every human need. Steeped in tradition and united by values, together we make the impossible, possible.

Making What If Possible

Our Story

At Texas A&M College of Nursing, we dedicate our lives to the betterment of others. We’re producing the next generation of caregivers who will not only treat patients, but also advocate for their best interest. With years of life on the line, we don’t spare a second. We bring the fight to every fighting chance. Our relentless commitment to the health and well-being of those around us stems from the core values we hold dear. With cutting-edge classroom technologies and simulated experiences, we’re the change-makers who question traditional methods. United by our bold attitude and strong desire to improve patient care, we’re redefining the profession’s impact for generations to come.

95% of graduates find a job within 3 months of graduation.
forensic nurse examining patient

What if every victim of assault received forensic treatment?

Forensic nurses serve as first responders to a variety of types of interpersonal violence, including sexual abuse, domestic violence and child or elder abuse. The College of Nursing is advancing efforts to train more forensic nurses in Texas, hoping to close gaps that currently exist between health care, law enforcement and the legal system.

Forensic nurses serve as first responders to a variety of types of interpersonal violence, including sexual abuse, domestic violence and child or elder abuse. The College of Nursing is advancing efforts to train more forensic nurses in Texas, hoping to close gaps that currently exist between health care, law enforcement and the legal system.

nursing students tend to a patient in a shelter on disaster day

What if health care teams were educated together?

In a real disaster, health care providers like nurses, physicians and pharmacists must all work together. Texas A&M nursing students coordinate a disaster training scenario each year for students from all the health professions so they’ll be better prepared to save as many lives as possible.

In a real disaster, health care providers like nurses, physicians and pharmacists must all work together. Texas A&M nursing students coordinate a disaster training scenario each year for students from all the health professions so they’ll be better prepared to save as many lives as possible.

a woman with a black eye

What if we could keep women and children away from abuse?

Women who leave their abusive partners to seek refuge at a shelter have taken the first step toward safety for themselves and their children. The lucky ones will be able to exit the shelter and start new lives, away from the threat of violence. But, for others, it’s not that easy.

Women who leave their abusive partners to seek refuge at a shelter have taken the first step toward safety for themselves and their children. The lucky ones will be able to exit the shelter and start new lives, away from the threat of violence. But, for others, it’s not that easy.

blue light revealing a bruise on an arm

What if we could ‘see’ invisible bruises?

When someone is physically hurt, their bruising is a way to corroborate what they say happened, to “prove” to the outside world that a trauma occurred. This may be especially important for victims of abuse, but what if the bruise has started to heal or is hard to see? Now a special type of light may be able to illuminate the hidden injury.

When someone is physically hurt, their bruising is a way to corroborate what they say happened, to “prove” to the outside world that a trauma occurred. This may be especially important for victims of abuse, but what if the bruise has started to heal or is hard to see? Now a special type of light may be able to illuminate the hidden injury.

bolivian patients outside of clinic

What if health care was everywhere?

A team of health care professionals and students from multiple disciplines traveled to a remote Bolivian village to provide needed health care. Students said they received more back than they gave, including an improved ability to work as a team and a new cultural sensitivity that they can bring to future patients.

A team of health care professionals and students from multiple disciplines traveled to a remote Bolivian village to provide needed health care. Students said they received more back than they gave, including an improved ability to work as a team and a new cultural sensitivity that they can bring to future patients.

nurses at a hospital nursing station

What if a hospital shift-change didn’t affect patients?

Shift changes can be a scary time for a hospital patient, and sometimes for good reason: possibilities for poor communication between providers as one hands over patient care to the next can lead to negative outcomes. Luckily, Texas A&M is taking steps to make the transition as seamless as possible across the profession.

Shift changes can be a scary time for a hospital patient, and sometimes for good reason: possibilities for poor communication between providers as one hands over patient care to the next can lead to negative outcomes. Luckily, Texas A&M is taking steps to make the transition as seamless as possible across the profession.

Graduates consistently rank among the highest in the nation on the national licensing exam.

Hanna Himes

Hanna Himes and a group of inter-disciplinary Health Science Center students ventured off to the remote village of Quesimpuco, Bolivia to deliver care to the people. They were welcomed into the community, and were given the chance to make a real difference.