pharmacist working with pills

College of Pharmacy

For us, "what if" is not a simple question. It’s what we wake up for. At Texas A&M, we boldly raise our hands first and find solutions to seemingly impossible questions. Whether addressing health disparities in underserved populations, the struggles within America’s health care system, or cutting-edge innovations to fight the deadliest diseases, we are on the forefront of every human need. Steeped in tradition and united by values, together we make the impossible, possible.

Making What If Possible

Our Story

At Texas A&M Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, we’ve stepped boldly into the ring to take on one of the most pressing health care shortages in the state of Texas: the scarcity of pharmacists along the border region. As the first professional school in South Texas, we haven’t spared a second in our charge. We have taken our responsibility beyond our creation, to help battle the many seemingly impossible challenges facing the region’s health care climate. Through scientific discovery and community outreach, we are reimagining the profession, moving beyond the counter for the benefit of our patients. A single, progressive force, we’re preparing future pharmacists to serve as an integral part of the health care team. And our impact will be felt for years to come.

60% of graduates practice in underserved areas of the USA.
art with the words HIV and AIDS

What if we could eradicate HIV with a condom?

Listed among the “nine condoms of the future” and backed by the Gates Foundation, a Texas A&M pharmacy researcher created a condom lined with a hydrogel capable of killing HIV, preventing the virus’ spread even if the condom breaks. It also has an antioxidant that enhances sexual pleasure to encourage the condom’s use.

Listed among the “nine condoms of the future” and backed by the Gates Foundation, a Texas A&M pharmacy researcher created a condom lined with a hydrogel capable of killing HIV, preventing the virus’ spread even if the condom breaks. It also has an antioxidant that enhances sexual pleasure to encourage the condom’s use.

tumor

What if chemotherapy didn’t attack healthy cells?

Current forms of tumor-targeting strategies can leave the patient with numerous side effects, ranging from hair loss to nausea and beyond. However, a team of Texas A&M pharmacy researchers are creating new drug “nanocarriers” that pinpoint cancer cells and focus the drug on them—leaving the healthy cells unharmed.

Current forms of tumor-targeting strategies can leave the patient with numerous side effects, ranging from hair loss to nausea and beyond. However, a team of Texas A&M pharmacy researchers are creating new drug “nanocarriers” that pinpoint cancer cells and focus the drug on them—leaving the healthy cells unharmed.

pregnant patient talking to doctor

What if preeclampsia could be detected early—and reversed?

In the United States alone, approximately 10,500 babies die from preeclampsia each year, but we still don’t fully understand the disease. A Texas A&M pharmacy researcher is looking to make preeclampsia a thing of the past.

In the United States alone, approximately 10,500 babies die from preeclampsia each year, but we still don’t fully understand the disease. A Texas A&M pharmacy researcher is looking to make preeclampsia a thing of the past.

pharmacist researchers preparing samples

What if cancer treatment also eliminated the pain?

For some patients, cancer treatment can be as painful and debilitating as the disease, but according to a Texas A&M pharmacy researcher, this doesn’t have to be the case. He is developing new types of chemotherapeutic drugs that can kill pancreatic cancer and suppress the cancer pain at the same time.

For some patients, cancer treatment can be as painful and debilitating as the disease, but according to a Texas A&M pharmacy researcher, this doesn’t have to be the case. He is developing new types of chemotherapeutic drugs that can kill pancreatic cancer and suppress the cancer pain at the same time.

pharmacist dispensing medication

What if your local pharmacist participated in your overall care?

Gone are the days of pharmacists simply dispensing pills into bottles. Instead, pharmacists across the United States are providing services that move beyond the traditional roles of their profession, and the local rural pharmacist is a major player in providing good health care.

Gone are the days of pharmacists simply dispensing pills into bottles. Instead, pharmacists across the United States are providing services that move beyond the traditional roles of their profession, and the local rural pharmacist is a major player in providing good health care.

hands holding a medication bottle

What if new medications were readily available?

When we take medications, we assume they are safe. The same is true for drugs tested in clinical trials. A new state-of-the-art drug development facility at Texas A&M will create the medications researchers need to advance their scientific discovery.

When we take medications, we assume they are safe. The same is true for drugs tested in clinical trials. A new state-of-the-art drug development facility at Texas A&M will create the medications researchers need to advance their scientific discovery.