medical student with tablet

Texas A&M Health Science Center

For us, "what if" is not a simple question. It’s what we wake up for. At Texas A&M, we boldly raise our hands first and find solutions to seemingly impossible questions. Whether addressing health disparities in underserved populations, the struggles within America’s health care system, or cutting-edge innovations to fight the deadliest diseases, we are on the forefront of every human need. Steeped in tradition and united by values, together we make the impossible, possible.

Making What If Possible

Our Story

At Texas A&M University Health Science Center, we’re creating the next generation of innovators, advocates, caregivers and life-savers. Founded in 1999, our relatively young, nimble attitude allows us to keep up with a rapidly evolving health care landscape, while not abandoning the land-grant origins upon which we were built. With state-of-the-art research, transformative education and team-based health care delivery, we are on the leading edge of it all. United by our untiring dedication and fueled by our diverse backgrounds, we’re not afraid to challenge conventional wisdom and we don’t accept the status quo. We ask “what if” and “why not,” to make things better. Our craft goes beyond diagnosing and treating patients to create purposeful, sustainable health care that delivers value to the state, the nation and the world. With our combined forces, we will stop at nothing to make a difference.

Our Reach

With programs in dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health and medical sciences, we are one of the most comprehensive academic health centers in the nation. And our geographic makeup is just as wide-ranging. Campus locations span the state, providing connectivity to and potential impact in nearly every county in Texas.

The Texas A&M Health Science Center is the most comprehensive health science center in Texas.
young girl giving thumbs up

What if we could improve the health of the South Texas region?

Improving the health of an entire region is no easy feat. Healthy South Texas, a joint effort between the Texas A&M University Health Science Center and AgriLife Extension Service, will confront South Texas’ greatest health disparities, improving the quality of medical care and disease outcomes in the southern region of the state.

Improving the health of an entire region is no easy feat. Healthy South Texas, a joint effort between the Texas A&M University Health Science Center and AgriLife Extension Service, will confront South Texas’ greatest health disparities, improving the quality of medical care and disease outcomes in the southern region of the state.

doctor's image on a tablet

What if technology disrupted health care as we know it?

While technology has revolutionized just about every aspect of our lives, health care systems have lagged behind other areas in its adoption of technology. Thanks to a renewed focus on technology-supported innovation, Texas A&M is on the forefront of the next medical revolution that promises to reinvent health care in the 21st century.

While technology has revolutionized just about every aspect of our lives, health care systems have lagged behind other areas in its adoption of technology. Thanks to a renewed focus on technology-supported innovation, Texas A&M is on the forefront of the next medical revolution that promises to reinvent health care in the 21st century.

doctors working in military hospital

What if we served those who serve us?

The intersection of medicine and military holds an opportunity for selfless service unlike any other. The College of Medicine has supported advancements in military medicine and welcomed students who embody selfless service. An expanded partnership with Darnall Army Medical Center at Fort Hood continues to build on this model.

The intersection of medicine and military holds an opportunity for selfless service unlike any other. The College of Medicine has supported advancements in military medicine and welcomed students who embody selfless service. An expanded partnership with Darnall Army Medical Center at Fort Hood continues to build on this model.

tire swing outside house

What if living in rural America wasn’t a health risk?

People living in rural areas face greater health challenges than their urban counterparts. In fact, rurality is considered one of the 14 biggest health disparities. Although access plays a role, the contributing factors are complicated, and some groups are hit harder than others. Texas A&M is intently focused on addressing rural population health—bringing care where it is needed most.

People living in rural areas face greater health challenges than their urban counterparts. In fact, rurality is considered one of the 14 biggest health disparities. Although access plays a role, the contributing factors are complicated, and some groups are hit harder than others. Texas A&M is intently focused on addressing rural population health—bringing care where it is needed most.

nursing and medical students

What if your doctor and nurse learned together from the start?

As a comprehensive health science center, with colleges of dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health, Texas A&M students receive unique interprofessional learning experiences that prepare them to work within the complete health care system, and learn to treat the entire patient—so that patients receive the best outcomes.

As a comprehensive health science center, with colleges of dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health, Texas A&M students receive unique interprofessional learning experiences that prepare them to work within the complete health care system, and learn to treat the entire patient—so that patients receive the best outcomes.

medical paperwork

What if our health care system kept us healthy?

The current health care system only steps in after someone is diagnosed with an illness. And while medical breakthroughs are vital, sometimes we prize the “grand cure” and forget the importance of preventing deadly conditions in the first place. So what if our health care system could be restructured to prevent—and not just treat—illness?

The current health care system only steps in after someone is diagnosed with an illness. And while medical breakthroughs are vital, sometimes we prize the “grand cure” and forget the importance of preventing deadly conditions in the first place. So what if our health care system could be restructured to prevent—and not just treat—illness?